Meet Ausdance National Vice President Elizabeth More

In This Article

Ausdance National has a new National Council made up of highly experienced and skilled individuals who have taken charge of your national peak body and are continuing its work.

Hear from the National Vice President on how she got started in dance, and why she believes a national dance advocacy organisation is important for Australian dance.

Meet Ausdance Vice President Elizabeth More, AM

Elizabeth More

How did you get started in dance?

Apart from apparently dancing in my mother’s womb, I was ill as a child, and it was thought dancing would assist my health. It was (and is) my passion and I worked with the Borovansky company as a child, won a Scully-Borovansky ballet scholarship to the Royal Ballet School in London, worked with the company and with Harlequin Ballet in England and won the Silver Medal at the Genee RAD ballet competition.

What was the first Ausdance National project or activity in which you participated?

I have been involved in numerous national projects over my 11 years with Ausdance NSW so honestly cannot recall the very first—but all worthwhile in line with the mission of the organisation (including involvement in youth dance and the Australian Dance Awards).

What is the key benefit that Ausdance membership offers to its members?

It offers a potent voice for the dance sector in Australia across key stakeholders, primarily the Federal government, and provides a ‘family’ and ‘community’ for those who are involved in the broad dance sector.

Why did you decide to join the Ausdance National Council?

I will be stepping down as Chair of Ausdance NSW in May, after having served 11 years in the role and wanted to be involved in the new Council during the transition period so that I could contribute my knowledge and experience to rebuilding the Ausdance entity to serve all its stakeholders to the best of my abilities.

Why do you believe a national dance advocacy organisation is important for Australian dance?

In an era of competing demands for our stakeholders in the dance sector and the broader arts and entertainment industry, especially for resources, it is crucial we have a strong voice to lobby and advocate on behalf of dance which is often not at the top of the list in the arts arena. Given the impact of dance not only in its own traditional right but also in relation to health and wellbeing (physical and psychological), it is a vital part of a healthy society and culture.

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