Meet Ausdance National President Gene Moyle

In This Article

Ausdance National has a new National Council made up of highly experienced and skilled individuals who have taken charge of your national peak body and are continuing its work.

Hear from the National President on how she got started in dance, and why she believes a national dance advocacy organisation is important for Australian dance.

Gene MoyleGene Moyle. Photo: David Kelly

How did you get started in dance?

My mother took me to my first ‘movement’ classes at four years of age, because I had been dancing around non-stop since I could stand on my own—particularly to Simon & Garfunkel songs!

What was the first Ausdance National project or activity in which you participated?

The first project I was aware of and benefitted from as a dancer was the Safe Dance Project. Tony Geeves was one of my dance lecturers at QUT in 1990, and he helped to increase our awareness of how we consciously approached our dancing—being mindful of how we treated and cared for our bodies so we could have long sustainable careers like him!

The first projects I participated in was the SCOPE and SCOPE for Artists programs. I was a Career Advisor in each of the programs and was very grateful to be able to support a range of artists with their career development and transition plans.

What is the key benefit that Ausdance membership offers to its members?

I believe there are many benefits; however, the ones that come to mind immediately include advocacy, connection to a national dance community, and access to important education and information.

Why did you decide to join the Ausdance National Council?

Ausdance has a lengthy 40-year history and has made significant contributions to the advancement of dance, dancers, and the many people who work across the dance industry. At such a critical time, I thought it important to be able to contribute in a way that could assist in continuing its wonderful legacy—so future dance lovers can benefit from its contributions, just as I have.

Why do you believe a national dance advocacy organisation is important for Australian dance?

Every profession benefits from having an advocacy body to ensure that their specific needs are represented and that their unique contributions are understood, supported, and celebrated.

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