Jacqueline has over 30 years’ experience in dance and dance education. She established the Bachelor of Arts (Dance) at Nepean College of Advanced Education (now Western Sydney University) and led the successful redevelopment and accreditation of the Bachelor of Dance Education at ACPE (Australian College of Physical Education). More recently she constructed a second dance degree for ACPE: The Bachelor of Applied Dance.

Jacqui’s most recent role at ACPE was Associate Dean, Students and Services. Her responsibilities included strategic leadership in the areas of student engagement, welfare and retention, from initial contact through to alumni relationships with the College. As an educator, Jacqui’s philosophy of teaching is underpinned by research in somatic practices and dance as a community art. She completed the Feldenkrais Teacher Training course and is a qualified Iyengar yoga teacher. Publications include Dancers and communities: A collection of writings about dance as a community art (1997), edited with Helen Poynor; and Somdance Manual (2002), coauthored with Greg Holdaway and Zoran Kovich.

Her service to the dance community has included her work as President of Ausdance NSW; Chair of the Dance Committee, NSW Ministry for the Arts (now Arts NSW); and Chair of the Tertiary Dance Council of Australia. She was also a member of NSW’s HSC Dance Examination committee.

Jacqui is currently working with Canberra Dance Theatre and Belconnen Arts Centre, enjoying the challenges of using dance to promote creative and healthy living, and social inclusion.

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Publications

Dancers and communities: a collection of writings about dance as a community art

The stories in this book illustrate the rich exchange that takes place between dancers and communities. Dance can be an accessible and empowering creative tool for individuals and groups to express their identity, feelings, histories and aspirations. People of all ages and from all walks of life are represented in this book, participating in ongoing dance projects, celebratory events, and performances. Locations range from work places to detention centres to natural environments. The artists represented in this collection are committed and experienced, sharing a common enthusiasm to practise their art with communities. Their words and those of the participants are inspiring, challenging and thought provoking, making this book a unique contribution to the practice of dance in Australian communities.

Articles