Contributors

Our contributors—the talented people who research and write about dance—their work champions innovation, creativity and diversity in dance.

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Matthew Day View Full Bio

Matthew Day is a choreographer, dancer and dramaturg working across various artistic mediums and cultural contexts. Matthew is invested in conceptual choreographic practices that are intensely physical and push the boundaries of dance and performance. A teenage ballroom dancing champion, Matthew went on to study dance and performance studies at UWS, NSW (2003/2004) and at the VCA, VIC (2005) before collaborating with students at the SNDO, Netherlands (2006-2009). Matthew has had residencies at Critical Path, Lucy Guerin Inc., Chunky Move, Legs on the Wall, Campbelltown Arts Centre and the Bundanon Trust, where he worked with Deborah Hay on her Solo Commissioning Project. Matthew is currently engaged on a number of upcoming projects with the infamous Phillip Adams BalletLab. Matthew’s minimalist and durational solo works Thousands, Cannibal and Intermission constitute his acclaimed TRILOGY project and each explore the body as a site of continual becoming and infinite potential. These works have been presented in Next Wave, Sydney Fringe, Brisbane Festival-Under the Radar, Dance Massive, Melbourne Festival and in 2013 will begin to tour internationally.

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Alexander Dea View Full Bio

Alexander Dea is an ethnographer-performer living in Central Java documenting, with video and audio, the last remaining masters of classical performing arts. He also makes new works with Asia’s contemporary and classical artists, Didik Nini Thowok, the late Ben Suharto, Ramli Ibrahim, and others. He writes on dance activity both traditional and modern.

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Kathie and Pat Debenham View Full Bio

Professor Kathie Debenham PhD, CLMA, Utah Valley University, has developed programs and curricula in university, secondary and primary school settings, and directed companies of children/youth, university, and professional dancers. She has presented the Laban/Bartenieff work at numerous regional, national, and international conferences in dance and in the humanities. Pat Debenham is a CLMA and Professor of Contemporary Dance and Music Theatre at Brigham Young University. In addition to workshops and choreography that have been presented internationally, he has published in Research in Dance Education, The Journal of Dance Education, NAHE Interdisciplinary Journal and Contact Quarterly. Pat’s professional work demonstrates how Laban principles can be woven into and through all aspects of a dance curriculum.

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Elizabeth Dempster View Full Bio

Dr Elizabeth Dempster is a performer, choreographer, writer and critic. She is senior lecturer in dance at Victoria University and a member of the boards of Writings on Dance and Dance Exchange. Her research interests include practice-based performance, critical, analytic and choreographic dance writing; modern and post modern dance practice and theory; improvisational technologies and performance; philosophies of the body and feminist methodologies.

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Ann Dils View Full Bio

Ann Dils is Professor in the Department of Dance, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and a member of UNCG’s Women’s and Gender Studies Coordinating Council. She served as editor (2006-2008) and co-editor (2003-2005) of Dance Research Journal and co-edited the collections Intersections: Dance, Place, and Identity (2006) and Moving History/Dancing Cultures: A Dance History Reader (2001). She is co-director of Accelerated Motion, a web-based dance preservation and curriculum project. Dils recently reconstructed the Cocteau/Milhaud 1920 farce Le Boeuf sur le Toit and is currently writing an article about audience reception and the presentation of reconstructed dance.

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Julie Dyson / Chair, National Advocates for Arts Education View Full Bio

Julie works in a voluntary capacity as an arts advocate across several organisations, including Canberra’s Childers Group, Sydney Dance Company’s education advisory panel, as a global executive member of the World Dance Alliance, as an adviser for the Australian Dance Awards, and as a member of the ArtsPeak executive. Julie chairs the National Advocates for Arts Education (NAAE), and is the former national director of Ausdance, where her work included policy development, advice to funding bodies, government departments, companies and individual artists, and the initiation of innovative partnerships to promote and support contemporary dance, performers and educators. She works as a volunteer on the dance collections at the National Library of Australia and Ausdance National, and has edited many publications, including Shaping the Landscape – Celebrating Dance in Australia and Shifting Sands: Dance in Asia and the Pacific.

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Clare Dyson View Full Bio

Clare Dyson is a choreographer, researcher and choreoturg. She creates collaborative dance, theatre and site-specific performance and has toured her works throughout Australia and internationally. Clare has been artist-in-residence with several institutions in Australia and received fellowships and residencies internationally including Cité des Arts in Paris, Tanzfabrik in Berlin and Djerassi in the US. In 2006 she won an Australian Dance Award for Outstanding Achievement in Independent Dance for Churchill’s Black Dog and her work The Voyeur was nominated for best Independent Dance at the 2010 Australian Dance Awards, touring throughout the US. Clare is currently a lecturer at the Queensland University of Technology and researches audience engagement and reflective practice in the creative industries.

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Jennifer de Leon View Full Bio

Jennifer De Leon is a dance performer, choreographer and teacher and Director of Poyema Dance Company. She is also a psychotherapist (NZAP) and dance therapist, trained in UK, USA and NZ and founder of The Healing Dance Dance/Movement Psychotherapy, as well as a Laban Movement Fundamentals Certificated Practitioner (New York), a Master Practitioner in Neuro Linguistic Programming, and registered Dance Teacher (NZADT). Jenny is based in Auckland where she lives with her 2 children and is currently, alongside her dancing activities, embarking on her Doctorate.

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Tess de Quincey View Full Bio

Tess de Quincey is a choreographer and dancer who has worked throughout Europe, Japan and Australia as a performer, teacher and director. Trained in dance, graphics and sculpture in London and Copenhagen, she was formerly a performer with butoh dancer Min Tanaka and his Mai-Juku Performance Co in Japan 1985–91. Her interdisciplinary performances are based in the Body Weather philosophy and methodology founded by Min and Mai-Juku. Tess has created an extensive body of artworks in different terrains, from the city to the desert, both nationally and internationally, with a focus on durational, site-specific and intercultural environments. Major solo productions ‘Movement on the Edge’, ‘Another Dust’, is ‘.2’ and ‘Nerve 9’ have toured Australia and Europe. In 2000, Tess formed De Quincey Co which is Australia’s leading Body Weather company — works have ranged from The Scent Trilogy, a glamtrash series of interventions in nightclubs, through to the intense and intimate suite of Five Short Solos in linked tiny spaces, Dictionary of Atmospheres, drawing audiences through the riverbed in Alice Springs, and most recently Run, which unfolded a gigantically scaled three-tonne sculptural performance engine as an enquiry into energy and motion.

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Scott deLahunta View Full Bio

Scott deLahunta works from his base in Amsterdam as a researcher, writer and organiser on a wide range of international projects bringing performing arts into conjunction with other disciplines and practices. He is a Research Fellow with Dartington College of Arts and the Amsterdam School of the Arts.

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Martin del Amo View Full Bio

Martin del Amo, originally from Germany, is a Sydney-based dancer and choreographer. He is best known for his full-length solos, fusing idiosyncratic movement and intimate storytelling. These include It’s a Jungle Out There. (2009), Never Been This Far Away From Home (2007) and Under Attack (2005), all of which received significant critical acclaim. In recent years, Martin has extended his practice to choreographing group works and solos for others including Anatomy of an Afternoon (2012), Mountains Never Meet (2011) and various solos for his ongoing multi-part choreographic project, Slow Dances For Fast Times. Martin regularly teaches for a wide range of arts organisations and companies and has extensively worked as mentor and consultant on projects initiated by young and emerging artists. He also writes and regularly contributes to RealTime magazine.

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