Safe Dance ®

Safe Dance ® practice

These Safe Dance ® practice guidelines include how to set up a safe learning environment, what makes a practice or performance venue safe, the importance of cater for physical different bodies and abilities, how movements might impact on the body, and simple injury prevention and management strategies.

Safe Dance IV—it would be nothing without you!

From January 2017 we will start analysing the rich and valuable data provided though the Safe Dance IV questionnaire. We will also be writing the 4th Safe Dance report, which will be made available to the dance community via the Ausdance National website. In particular this report will detail the current prevalence of injuries in Australia’s professional dance population and describe progress that has been made in injury prevention and management since the 3rd Safe Dance report was published in 1999. The major study conclusions will be used to help set priority areas for future dance research and action, make updated safe dance practice recommendations and assist with evaluations of current injury prevention initiatives.  

Dance research and the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science Conference 2016

The International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) 26th Annual Conference was held in Hong Kong on October 20–23 2016. A group of Australian academics, clinicians, dancers and students were thrilled to be able to travel to Hong Kong to present our work to the dance research community.  Australia should be proud to be at the forefront of this field, and a presentation on bibliometric analysis of dance publications identified Australia as one of the top countries in the world for quality and collaborative dance research!

Safe Dance: what does it mean and what’s changed over the past 20 years

The words ‘safe dance’ mean many different things to different parts of the dance community. It could be safe dance practice recommendations for teachers and studio owners, safe physical dance environments, injury prevention and safe return to dance practices, supporting the mental and physical development of dance students, the list goes on.

But how far have we come in preventing and managing injuries in Australia’s professional dancers? And are our dance practices safe?

Fuelling the dancer

What professional or serious dancers should be eating and drinking to train and perform at their best and minimise risks of injury and/or burnout.

Work health & safety for the dance industry

Some general advice for studio teachers and/or managers about meeting OH&S requirements for maintaining a safe dance environment and for caring for the participants in a dance class.

Eating disorders and dancers

How can dance teachers recognise students who might have an eating disorder, and how might they help them to acknowledge and deal with this complex and debilitating condition?

Caring for the dancer’s body

Traditionally, teaching and training concentrate on technique, alignment, flexibility and aesthetics. With advances in sports medicine and dance science research, there are easy-to-apply techniques to evaluate strengths and weaknesses.

Healthy bones for female dancers

This information is especially for young female dancers who can do much to prevent or minimise a common condition called osteoporosis by eating plenty of calcium during the growth years.

Safe Dance report 3

This report documents the recurrence of injury in Australia professional dancers. It follows the work of Tony Geeves which began 10 years earlier.

Safe Dance report 2

The second Safe Dance report presents research into adolescent health issues during intensive dance training.

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