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Corner Dance Lab 2015

16 – 24 January 2015

Dance Integrated Australia is excited to be hosting the second Corner Dance Lab in beautiful Federal (northern New South Wales).

The artistic line up for The Corner Dance Lab 2015 is:

Phil Blackman, Sean Campbell, Philip Channells, Hsin-Ju Chiu (Raw), Ben Ely, Kate Harman, Julian Louis, Kimberly McKintyre, Lee-Anne Litton, Kellie O’Dempsey, Timothy Ohl, Sarah-Vyne Vassallo, Gavin Webber.

Participants at the inaugural Corner Dance Lab, January 2014. Photo: Tim Standing / Daylight Breaks

As an independent artist who grew up in Byron Bay, it was my immense pleasure in returning to the region to participate in The Corner Dance Lab. Having the opportunity to work with a number of world-renowned leaders in dance and physical theatre, amongst such an inspiring and rich natural landscape made this experience unbeatable. Working alongside such a diverse range of artists in such a collaborative manner was truly remarkable and the artistic connections created are invaluable. The intensive needs to exist as a mainstay annual event for both the local and Australian wide artistic community.

—Harrison Hall, Independent Artist (Melbourne)

Early Bird Expressions of Interest are now open. Register now and save $100!

Request an EOI form or telephone Philip Channells on +61 432 073 304 for more information.

Read about Corner Dance Lab 2014.

International event for community dance practitioners

13 – 15 November 2014 Cardiff, Wales

The Foundation for Community Dance (FDUC) in the UK is proud to present this program of workshops, demonstrations and presentations for professionals working in the community dance sector.

Titled 'People Dancing', this event provides an opportunity to share practice and approaches to engaagemant across different international, social, economic and political contexts. 

Wherever and however you work with people in dance, 'People Dancing' provides an opportunity to share your practice and approaches to engagement across different international, social, economic and political contexts.

To find out more visit the FDUC website.

The Right Foot workshops

The Right Foot workshops are for young people ged 14 – 26 with and without a disability and are presented by DirtyFeet in partnership with Bankstown Arts Centre.

Led by Sarah-Vyne Vassallo and the professional DirtyFeet team, these workshops are an opportunity to improve dance skills and explore creativity.

When: 10am – 1.30pm, 13 & 14 September and 20 & 21 September
Where: Bankstown Arts Centre 5 Olympic Parade (entry via Dale Parade)
Access: Suitable for low to moderate support needs; wheelcahir accessible venue; accessible parking at Olympic Parade carpark.

Bookings essential.

The Right Foot is supported by the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

Community dance conference—call for submissions

25 – 29 November 2015
University of Otago, New Zealand

Call for submissions

‘Moving Communities’ is an exciting four-day conference that will provide an opportunity to bring together practitioners, academics and students to celebrate and discuss themes and topics within the broad field of community dance.

The conference will be co-hosted by the Dance Studies Programme at the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences and the Caroline Plummer Fellowship Committee.

A special feature of the conference will be the reunion of the ten recipients of the Caroline Plummer Fellowship in Community Dance. This prestigious six-month Fellowship was made possible by the family of the late Caroline Plummer and was first offered in 2005.

The school is now inviting submissions for paper presentations, workshops, panel discussions and community performances from those who are engaged in Community Dance practice, education and research internationally.

Conference themes

  • Culture and community dance
  • Community dance and multi-culturalism
  • Indigenous practices
  • Integrated dance
  • Inter-generational dance
  • Diverse dancing communities
  • Community dance and health (and the public health sector)
  • Community dance and social and environmental politics
  • Creating infrastructure and policy making for community dance practice
  • Leadership and best practice
  • Community dance education
  • Critical issues and ethical considerations

Deadline for abstract proposals (300 words plus 100-word biography):  30 April 2015

Submit your abstract.

For more information you can contact Ali East, Chair Dance Studies, University of Otago..


 

International Scientific Conference—anatomy of dance

20 – 21 November 2014, St. Petersburg State Museum of Theatre and Music

The International Scientific Conference Anatomy of Dance is part of the Festival Diaghilev P.S. which was founded in 2009, when the whole world celebrated the 100th anniversary of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. Since then it has established itself in the Russian cultural events playbill, has been included in the calendar of the most important European festivals and has found its unique creative personality.

The program planned for 2014 comprises tours of Wayne McGregor's Random Dance Company and Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, with participation of Shaolin monks in Sutra. George Balanchine's ballet Raymonda Variations performed by students of the Vaganova Ballet Academy will be supplemented with the photo exhibition by Paul Kolnik.

See the full festival program.

This International Scientific Conference will be dedicated to the interdisciplinary research of dance, choreography and body, with in-depth investigation into the following areas:

  • Limits and definitions of dance art
  • Classical dance in the post-contemporary situation
  • Dance as a subject of science
  • Dance in the context of new media
  • Creativity and distributed cognitive process
  • Body, corporeity, movement

For more information visit the Festival Diaghilev P.S. website.
 

International Solo Dance/Theatre Festival

12 – 15 March 2015, Stuttgart

This international festival held in Germany provides the platform for an international choreographic competition for contemporary choreographers and young dancers (under 30 years).

Participants from all over the world are requested to perform a solo piece which is new, original, imaginative, unique and which displays unusual achievement. A respected jury will judge choreographic and dance skills as well as musicality, interpretation and performance.

Prizes to a total value of €16.000 are awarded.

To find out more visit the Treffpunkt Rotebuehlplatz website.

Tribute to Tanja Liedtke—Stuttgart 2015

12 – 15 March 2015, Stuttgart

The 19th International Solo Dance/Theatre Festival will be a tribute to the late Tanja Liedtke.

This international choreographic competition is held over four days sees contemporary young choreographers (under 30 years) showcase their most recent work before an internationally-renowned jury. The choreographed solo dance pieces submitted should be under one-year old and between 9 and 12 minutes long.

Prize winners will take part in tours in May and November, travelling both within Germany and internationally.

Deadline for applications: 11 November 2014.  

Apply now.

Bodies of Thought: 12 Australian Choreographers

Erin Brannigan and Virginia Baxter are the editors of this new book that focuses specifically on twelve choreographers.

Bodies of Thought: 12 Australian Choreographers features a generation of award-winning, innovative Australian choreographers with international reputations and legacies of influence.

The artists featured are Kate Champion, Rosalind Crisp, Tess de Quincey, Russell Dumas, Lucy Guerin, Sue Healey, Helen Herbertson, Gideon Obarzanek, Stephen Page, Garry Stewart, Meryl Tankard & Ros Warby.

Focusing on a work by each artist—with an interview and an essay by a leading dance scholar—this groundbreaking book offers invaluable insights into the creation of remarkable works, at a time when Australian dance is enjoying international acclaim.

Beautifully designed and with great photos, this could be a "coming of age" book for Australian Dance Studies.

—Stephen Muecke, Professor of Writing, School of the Arts and Media, University of New South Wales

The field of innovative dance in Australia is vibrant and diverse. With their extensive background as writers in the field, the editors have created a collection of essays that offers a lucid account of a wide range of experimental dance work and conveys some of the excitement it generates in live performance. Combined with the RealTimeDance web portal, this book makes an important and timely contribution.

—Jane Goodall, Adjunct Professor, Writing and Society Research Group, The University of Western Sydney

You can purchase directly from Wakefield Press or from bookshops.

Editors: Dr Erin Brannigan, Senior Lecturer in Dance, School of Arts and Media, UNSW and Virginia Baxter, Managing Editor, RealTime. Publishers: RealTime and Wakefield Press

Keir Choreographic Award—winner announced

The inaugural Keir Choreographic Award has been awarded to Atlanta Eke. The People's Choice Award went to Sydney artist Jane McKernan, as selected by audience members at the grand final at Carriageworks.

Four of the eight commissioned artists—Sarah Aiken, Matthew Day, Atlanta Eke, Jane McKernan—competed for the inaugural award at Carriageworks in Sydney in July.

The international and national line-up of judges includes a range of voices from the artistic community, from visual art through to dance from Australia and around the world including: Mårten Spångberg, the acclaimed 'bad boy' of contemporary dance pushing the boundaries of the art form in polite society; Matthew Lyons, curator at experimental cultural hub The Kitchen in New York; Josephine Ridge Creative Director of Melbourne Festival and one of Australia's most experienced arts identities, Becky Hilton a leading Australian choreographer, director and teacher  and Phillip Keir, The Keir Foundation Director and visionary behind the Award.

Earlier this year, Carriageworks, Dancehouse and the Keir Foundation partnered for the first time to present the Keir Choreographic Award, dedicated to commissioning new choreographic works and to bringing significant support and increased profiling to the contemporary dance sector, both nationally and internationally.

Among the many benefits, the Award includes a cash prize of $30,000 for first prize and $10,000 for an audience choice prize.

Out of the 77 entries, the eight artists commissioned of this inaugural edition were:
Sarah Aiken (VIC); James Batchelor (VIC); Tim Darbyshire (VIC); Matthew Day (VIC); Atlanta Eke (VIC); Shaun Gladwell (NSW); Jane McKernan (NSW); and Brooke Stamp (VIC). Read more about their work .

The biennial Keir Choreographic Award is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts.

Dancehouse residency programs

The Housemate programs reflect Dancehouse's commitment to advancing innovative contemporary dance in Australia by instigating and nurturing rigorous discourse and encouraging wide-ranging, movement-based experimentation and innovative choreographic practices.

Both Performance and Research Housemate programs provide the artist with extensive time, generous financial support and a thoroughly mentored environment. The Housemate program is one of the very few fully paid artist-in-residence programs in the world. Artists are given between 8 and 14 weeks of free studio space, a salary package (or pro rata), and administrative, mentoring and production support. Housemates are selected by a peer advisory panel from a national call for applicants.

Housemate research program

August – December 2014

The Housemate Research program offered in the second half of each year concentrates on research and experimentation, with no imperative to present an outcome. It gives space to experimental, cutting-edge and sometimes even insular research, thus supporting the discovery of new ground in choreographic exploration.

Housemate performance program

March — July 2015

The Housemate Performance program in the first half of each year, focuses solely on creative development leading to a new work and formal performance season which is presented in one of the two Dancehouse theatres.

For more information and application forms visit Dancehouse website.

2014 International Dance Day message

On 29 April every year, the international dance community celebrates International Dance Day.

We celebrate our art form's ability to cross all political, cultural and ethnic barriers and bring people together with a common language—dance.

Mourad Merzouki's 2014 International Dance Day message

Every artist takes pride in his art.

Every artist will always defend the art form whose encounter has changed his life. For that which he has sought and lost and for that which he has the burning desire to share: be it the echo of a voice, the discovered word, the interpretation of a text for humanity, the music without which the universe will stop speaking to us, or the movement which opens the doors to grace.

I have, for dance, not only the pride of a dancer and choreographer, but profound gratitude. Dance gave me my lucky break. It has become my ethics by virtue of its discipline and provided the means through which I discover the world daily.

Closer to me than anything else, it gives me strength each day through the energy and generosity as only dance can. Its poetry comforts me.

Could I say that I wouldn’t exist without dance? Without the capacity for expression it has given me? Without the confidence I have found in it to overcome my fears, to avoid dead ends?

Thanks to dance, immersed in the beauty and complexity of the world, I have become a citizen. A peculiar citizen who reinvents the social codes in the course of his encounters, remaining true to the values of the hip-hop culture which transforms negative energy into a positive force.

I live and breathe dance daily as an honour. But I am living with this honour deeply concerned. I witness around me the loss of bearings and the inability of some of the youth from the working class, growing up in tension and frustration, to imagine their future. I am one of them; so are we all. I am driven, perhaps more than others, by setting an example, to help them fuel their lust for life.

For isn’t society richer with the richness of each of us?

Culture, more than any discourse, unites. So have courage and take risks despite the obstacles and the hatred with which you will no doubt be confronted; the beauty of the world will always be by your side. Like dance has been for me. With its singular force to eliminate social and ethnic distinctions, leaving but the movement of bodies in their essence, of human beings returning to their pure expression, unique and shared.

I would like to end by quoting René Char whose words remind me daily to not let anyone confine us to scripted roles.

“Push your luck, hold on tight to your good fortune, and take your risk. Watching you, they will get used to it.”

So try, fail, start all over again but above all, dance, never stop dancing!

Translation: Petya Hristova and Charlene Lim

Thank you to the International Theatre Insititute's international dance committee, and the World Dance Alliance, who select an outstanding choreographer or dancer to write the message.

To read more about the day, or download the message in other languages, visit the International Dance Day website.

Journal of Emerging Dance Scholarship

The Journal of Emerging Dance Scholarship (JEDS) is published annually in September by the World Dance Alliance (WDA). It is designed to serve the needs of international dance scholars who are currently enrolled in a graduate program or within 5 years of having graduated from a graduate program in dance or a related field.

JEDS is published online as an open resource. Articles are selected to assure dance scholarship from around the world is included in each publication.Each article submission is reviewed by two international dance scholars with no more than 16 submissions accepted for the annual publication. Articles are chosen based on originality of research and the contributions each makes to the future of dance praxis (theory and practice).

JEDS Vol. 2 will be published 1 September, 2014

JEDS 2015 Vol. 3, will be comprised only of blind-reviewed papers selected from those presented at the 2014 World Dance Alliance Global Summit in Angers, France.

Visit the JEDS website to find out more.

Accessible Arts masterclasses 2013

Join leading choreographers, Sue Healey, Dean Walsh and Philip Channells in the Catalyst Dance Masterclass Series.

Accessible Arts is hosting a series of three masterclasses tailored to dancers with and without physical or sensory disability, and people with mental illness or acquired brain injury.

New Asia–Pacific Channels edition

The latest edition of Channels is jam-packed with exciting new dance activity in Asia and the Pacific. There are new dance networks, events, research, journals, books and more.

Some of the highlights include a new Nepal chapter of World Dance Alliance; plans for the 2014 Global Dance Summit, which will be held at the beautiful Centre National de la Dance Contemporaine in Angers, France; and Our Roots Right Now—The Research Forum and Festival of Thai/ASEAN Contemporary Theatre, at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Collage of dance event highlights from the 2013 edition of Asia-Pacific Channels1] Ter Wei Lun from Lee Wushu Arts Theatre in Wushu Madness II–The Realm Between, choreographed by Lee Swee Seng, in the Showpiece Performances of MyDance Festival 2013, at Panggung Bandaraya on 31 May 2013. Photo: Huneid Tyeb. 2] Kathak dance performed by Kalanidhi Indira Sangeet Mahabidhayalaya at International Dance Day on 29 April 2013 at Yalam Maya Kendra in Kathmandu, organised by the newly inaugurated WDAAP Nepal chapter. Photo by Raju Shakya & Prabin Lal Singh. 3] A ceremonial dance from the West New Britain province of Papua New Guinea, performed during the Foundation Day Celebrations at Port Moresby Grammar School on 4 April 2013. Photo: Naomi Faik-Simmer 4] Dr Maya Krishna Rao in her performance Ravanama, during the seminar ‘The Moving Space: Women in Performance’ at the Rabindranath Tagore Centre, Kolkata, on 3 February 2013. Photo: Kolkata Sanved 5] Thai choreographer Pichet Klunchun in his section of the tripartite Fire Fire Fire, on 28 January 2013 in the ‘Our Roots Right Now’ research forum and festival at Sodsai Pantoomkomol Centre for Dramatic Arts. Photo: L. Skar 6] The Nora Thummanit Thaksin University Group who performed Nora: Klong Hong in January 2013 in the ‘Our Roots Right Now’ research forum and festival at Sodsai Pantoomkomol Centre for Dramatic Arts.

NAAE welcomes new Arts Curriculum

The National Advocates for Arts Education (NAAE) has warmly welcomed news the ACARA Board has approved the new The Australian Curriculum: The Arts. NAAE, of which Ausdance is a member, has strongly supported the development of the arts curriculum and its central principle of the entitlement of every young Australian to an arts education, one that includes all five artforms – dance, drama, media arts, music and the visual arts.

National Dance Forum program

Opening and closing with interactive visioning sessions, the program featured a full morning 'Open Space' session on the Sunday tapping the pulse of the forum, and through it that of the dance sector in Australia.

Keynote artists-in-conversation were Dalisa Pigram, co-Artistic Director of Marrugeku, with David Pledger, and Artistic Director of Australian Dance Theatre Garry Stewart with Anne Thompson.

Dance, young people & change—diversity in action

The collaboration between World Dance Alliance (WDA) and dance and the Child international (daCi) produced one of the biggest global dance festivals ever held—Dance, Young People and Change. Hosted by the Taiwan National University of the Arts (TNUA) in Taipei, the event attracted young people from North and South America, Europe, the UK and most Asia-Pacific nations.

The festival/conference was a multi-layered event that included keynote addresses, ‘dance flavour’ taster classes, workshops, forums and paper presentations. It brought together young people, their parents, mentors and educators from across the world to reflect on key issues and future directions for dance in young people’s lives.

Ann Tai, Taiwan representative for daCI and teacher at TNUA, exuberant in the opening parade.

There was also a wonderful range of performances by young people, a festival of international dance academies, and an amazing program of Taiwanese dance performed by Taiwan’s professional companies and groups, including Cloud Gate 2 and Dance Forum. Teachers attended masterclasses and paper presentations and exchanged ideas about approaches to dance learning, teaching and curriculum for young people.

BlakDance 2012 triumph

BlakDance 2012 festival in Brisbane highlighted a wonderful range of contemporary Indigenous dance from Australia and New Zealand.

Choreographers, dancers, industry members and audiences came together to celebrate and gain a deeper understanding of contemporary Indigenous dance practice.

‘Shades of us’—a stunning AYDF finale

It was fantastic to be able to join the Ausdance NSW team, the choreographers and more than 150 young people from all over Australia on the last day of the Australian Youth Dance Festival at NAISDA Dance College in Gosford NSW.

Shades of Us, presented in Mt Penang Gardens on the final evening, was a performance that grew out of an intensive week of creative development with choreographers Sue Healey, Philip Channells, Anton, Kay Armstrong, Matt Cornel, Adelina Larsson, Lee Pemberton, Vicki Van Hout and artistic director Rowan Marchingo.

Communities making dance in Tasmania

Tasmanian Regional Arts (TRA) is leading The Dance Project in partnership with Mature Artists Dance Experience (MADE), Bust a Move and Tasdance.

This community dance project is happening in three Tasmanian regions—the North East, North West and the South—to develop and present three new contemporary dance works with, by and about communities. Evolving from the heart of each community, these works explore place, kinship and identity as experienced by the residents of these regions.

Building the Indigenous contemporary dance collection

Ever since we convened the 2005 Creating Pathways national Indigenous dance forum in Canberra, Lee Christofis—one of the keynote speakers, and now curator of dance at the National Library of Australia—has been keen to develop the NLA's Indigenous dance collection.

In the March 2012 edition of National Library News, Lee discusses some of the material now held in the collection and outlines the importance of its provenance.

Building the Indigenous contemporary dance collection makes fascinating reading for anyone interested in the development of Australian contemporary Indigenous dance.

More evidence that dance benefits the elderly

There are some startling new figures that support dancing as a protective strategy in preventing dementia. A Stanford University report Use It or Lose It: Dancing Makes You Smarter makes the following comparisons:

... almost none of the physical activities appeared to offer any protection against dementia. There can be cardiovascular benefits of course, but the focus of this study was the mind. There was one important exception: the only physical activity to offer protection against dementia was frequent dancing.

  • Reading—35% reduced risk of dementia
  • Bicycling and swimming—0%
  • Doing crossword puzzles at least four days a week—47%
  • Playing golf—0%
  • Dancing frequently—76%.

The same university offers other insights into the benefits of dance in Thoughts, philosophies and musings on social dance, a useful reference for community dance practitioners in Australia.

New research with dance and the elderly

New research by the University of Western Sydney is demonstrating that folk dance has clear benefits for the health of the elderly. You may have missed this great report from the ABC’s 7.30 program on 4 January.

We’re very interested in research that proves the links between dance and health, and have been in touch with the researchers to find out more.

Want to know more?

On your toes: Is there a different approach to aging? Listen to Glen Murray from MADE (Mature Artists Dance Experience) and Beverley Giles, an expert in the care of people affected by dementia, talking about how dance provides the three elements essential to health and well-being in mature adults.

Read Glen's paper about how older people can bring great riches to art-making.

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